How does juvenile arthritis affect your body?

JIA is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system mistakenly targets the synovium, the tissue that lines the inside of the joint, and the synovial fluid in the joint. This causes the synovium to make extra synovial fluid, which leads to swelling, pain and stiffness in the joint.

How does juvenile rheumatoid arthritis affect the body?

Systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis affects the whole body. This will cause a child to have the most and most severe symptoms. The spleen and lymph nodes may also become enlarged. Eventually many of the body’s joints are affected by swelling, pain, and stiffness.

What body systems are affected by juvenile arthritis?

An autoimmune disease that can affect the joints, skin, internal organs (i.e. heart, kidneys, lungs) and other areas of the body.

What are the long term effects of juvenile arthritis?

However, many patients experience detrimental effects, including joint deformity and destruction, growth abnormalities and retardation and osteoporosis, resulting in pain, impaired psychological health or difficulty with daily living. The course of disease is unpredictable and fluctuating.

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Does juvenile arthritis get worse with age?

It tends to get worse with time and typically affects joints on both sides of the body. Eye health problems: Although pinkeye and other eye infections are common in children, children with JIA are more vulnerable to chronic and severe eye problems.

Is juvenile arthritis serious?

Some types of juvenile idiopathic arthritis can cause serious complications, such as growth problems, joint damage and eye inflammation. Treatment focuses on controlling pain and inflammation, improving function, and preventing damage.

What does juvenile arthritis feel like?

Symptoms of juvenile arthritis may include: Joint stiffness, especially in the morning. Pain, swelling, and tenderness in the joints. Limping (In younger children, it may appear that the child is not able to perform motor skills they recently learned.)

What triggers juvenile arthritis?

The cause of juvenile arthritis is unknown. As with most autoimmune diseases, individual cases of JIA are likely due to a combination of genetic factors, environmental exposures, and the child’s immune system.

What happens if juvenile arthritis goes untreated?

If it is not treated, JIA can lead to: Permanent damage to joints. Interference with a child’s bones and growth. Chronic (long-term) arthritis and disability (loss of function)

Does juvenile arthritis weaken your immune system?

JIA is an autoimmune disease.

In some types of JIA, this process goes awry, and the adaptive immune system mistakes the body’s cells for foreign invaders. As a result, antibodies attach to the body’s own tissue instead (chiefly joint tissue), signaling the immune system to attack them.

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Is juvenile arthritis a disability?

The age of the child, the impact the condition is having on the child’s life, and the income of the child’s parents will also be considered. Even though SSA acknowledges juvenile arthritis as a disability, a person still needs to apply for benefits.

Does juvenile arthritis shorten life span?

A new study shows that children and teens with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis are susceptible to higher mortality rates than the general population. Most people don’t even realize that children and young adults can have arthritis — let alone die from it.

Can juvenile arthritis go away?

JIA is a chronic condition, meaning it can last for months and years. Sometimes the symptoms just go away with treatment, which is known as remission. Remission may last for months, years, or a person’s lifetime. In fact, many teens with JIA eventually enter full remission with little or no permanent joint damage.

What age does juvenile arthritis start?

starts between the ages of two and four years. is more common in girls. most often affects larger joints such as knees, ankles, wrists or elbows.

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