Is hyperthyroidism a secondary cause of osteoporosis?

Thyroid hormone deficiency in children results in impaired skeletal development and delayed bone age, while hyperthyroidism is associated with accelerated skeletal development and advanced bone age (43). Both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been associated with osteoporosis and increased risk of fractures.

Is hyperthyroidism a cause of osteoporosis?

High levels of thyroid hormones, or hyperthyroidism, cause rapid bone loss, and new bone might not be as strong as the bone lost. This process of increased bone loss over time causes osteoporosis.

Does hyperparathyroidism cause secondary osteoporosis?

Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is considered a cause of secondary osteoporosis as a consequence of its known catabolic effect promoting osteoclast activity and bone resorption.

What is the underlying cause of osteoporosis?

A lifelong lack of calcium plays a role in the development of osteoporosis. Low calcium intake contributes to diminished bone density, early bone loss and an increased risk of fractures.

What does thyroid do to bones?

Thyroid hormone affects the rate of bone replacement. Too much thyroid hormone (i.e. thyroxine) in your body speeds the rate at which bone is lost. If this happens too fast the osteoblasts may not be able to replace the bone loss quickly enough.

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What is Thyroid storm?

Thyroid storm is a very rare, but life-threatening condition of the thyroid gland that develops in cases of untreated thyrotoxicosis (hyperthyroidism, or overactive thyroid). The thyroid gland is located in the neck, just above where your collarbones meet in the middle.

Can secondary osteoporosis be cured?

Much like primary osteoporosis, there is no cure for secondary osteoporosis. Treatment for secondary osteoporosis can be a little more complex and depends on the underlying condition. Treatment of secondary osteoporosis is also aimed at preventing bone loss, fractures, and disability as well as controlling pain.

What is secondary prevention of osteoporosis?

Emphasis of the primary prevention is, besides a sufficient calcium intake, to omit risk factors; with secondary prevention the use of medical treatments such as estrogens/gestagens, bisphosphonates, and recently also SERMs is applied. The tertiary prevention tries mostly to reduce the femur fractures.

What are the two types of osteoporosis?

Two categories of osteoporosis have been identified: primary and secondary. Primary osteoporosis is the most common form of the disease and includes postmenopausal osteoporosis (type I), and senile osteoporosis (type II). Secondary osteoporosis is characterized as having a clearly definable etiologic mechanism.

How long does it take for hyperparathyroidism to cause osteoporosis?

Everyone suffering from hyperparathyroidism will have bone loss. The longer the process goes on the more bone loss they experience. On average it takes 8 years of having hyperparathyroidism before osteoporosis develops. If left untreated 2/3 will go on to develop osteoporosis.

What medications are commonly associated with secondary osteoporosis?

The medications most commonly associated with osteoporosis include phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and primidone. These antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are all potent inducers of CYP-450 isoenzymes.

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Is early menopause a risk factor for osteoporosis?

Conclusions: Early menopause is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Women with an early menopause should have bone density testing performed within 10 years of menopause so that osteopenia or osteoporosis will be diagnosed early and appropriate anti-resorptive therapy initiated.

Will osteoporosis shorten my life?

The residual life expectancy was 18.2 years for men beginning osteoporosis treatment at age 50 years and 7.5 years for men beginning treatment at age 75 years. The residual life expectancy was 26.4 years and 13.5 years for women who began treatment at ages 50 years and 75 years, respectively.

What organs are affected by osteoporosis?

Osteoporotic bone breaks are most likely to occur in the hip, spine or wrist, but other bones can break too. In addition to causing permanent pain, osteoporosis causes some patients to lose height. When osteoporosis affects vertebrae, or the bones of the spine, it often leads to a stooped or hunched posture.

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