Is osteoarthritis of the spine a disability?

If you suffer from arthritis of the spine (including osteoarthritis and facet arthritis), you may qualify for disability under Listing 1.04.

Can you get disability for osteoarthritis of the spine?

Osteoarthritis can be considered a disability by the SSA. You can get Social Security disability with osteoarthritis. When you apply for disability benefits, your diagnosis and medical evidence to back up your diagnosis needs to match a listing outlined in the SSA’s Blue Book.

How serious is osteoarthritis of the spine?

OA of the spine is a degenerative disease, but with treatment and lifestyle changes it’s possible to slow the progression of the disease and live a relatively pain-free, active life. This disease is unpredictable. Some people with OA become partially or severely disabled due to joint deterioration in their spine.

Is osteoarthritis considered a disability?

Because of the severity of osteoarthritis the Social Security Administration (SSA) has determined that it is a disability, meaning you may be eligible to receive disability benefits. When submitting your application to the SSA your diagnosis and medical evidence should be in the SSA’s Blue Book listing.

IT IS INTERESTING:  What is tendon remodeling?

What spine disorders qualify for disability?

Some of the most common disabling problems include spinal stenosis, osteoarthritis degenerative disc disease, spinal arachnoiditis, herniated discs, facet arthritis, and vertebral fracture.

Can you end up in a wheelchair with osteoarthritis?

Pain, stiffness, or difficulty moving could affect your mobility, making tasks like walking or driving very difficult. You may need to use a cane, walker, or wheelchair to get around.

Will osteoarthritis cripple me?

Osteoarthritis is rarely crippling, but it can have a major impact on a person’s life. Many people miss work days or skip favorite activities when the pain flares up. The condition is responsible for more than 27.5 million outpatient visits per year, according to data from the Arthritis Foundation.

How do you stop osteoarthritis from progressing?

Slowing Osteoarthritis Progression

  1. Maintain a Healthy Weight. Excess weight puts additional pressure on weight-bearing joints, such as the hips and knees. …
  2. Control Blood Sugar. …
  3. Get Physical. …
  4. Protect Joints. …
  5. Choose a Healthy Lifestyle.

How bad does osteoarthritis hurt?

Joint pain and stiffness can become severe enough to make daily tasks difficult. Depression and sleep disturbances can result from the pain and disability of osteoarthritis.

Can I get a blue badge if I have osteoarthritis?

You may be eligible for a blue badge, meaning you can park closer to where you need to go. If you claim benefits like Attendance Allowance or Personal Independence Payment, or you have difficulty getting around because of your arthritis, then this will support your application.

What is the most approved disability?

According to one survey, multiple sclerosis and any type of cancer have the highest rate of approval at the initial stages of a disability application, hovering between 64-68%. Respiratory disorders and joint disease are second highest, at between 40-47%.

IT IS INTERESTING:  Frequent question: Can you go to the ER for an ingrown toenail?

What is the maximum disability rating for degenerative disc disease?

Under the former rating criteria, Diagnostic Code 5293 assigned a maximum 60 percent disability rating for pronounced intervertebral disc syndrome, or degenerative disc disease, with persistent symptoms compatible with sciatic neuropathy with characteristic pain and demonstrable muscle spasm, absent ankle jerk, or …

Is it hard to get disability for degenerative disc disease?

Degenerative Disc Disease, or DDD, is among the most common impairments for which the Social Security Administration (SSA) receives disability applications. While it is a qualifying disability under certain circumstances, proving your condition meets the SSA’s duration and severity level requirements can be difficult.

Your podiatrist