What type of doctor specializes in the spine?

As orthopedic surgeons, orthopedic spine doctors concentrate primarily on repairing problems of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spinal anatomy. These surgeons spend every day assessing, diagnosing, and treating patients with spine-related injuries and conditions, including: Degenerative disc diseases.

What is a spine doctor called?

A spine specialist is a health professional who focuses mainly on treating spine conditions. Common specialists include chiropractors, physiatrists, physical therapists, orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, pain management physicians, anesthesiologists, and many rheumatologists and neurologists.

Should I see a neurologist or orthopedist for back pain?

While an orthopedic surgeon is a better choice if you need a new hip, knee, shoulder, or have a severely broken bone, anything related to the spine is best treated by a skilled neurosurgeon. If you have a back issue or severe back pain, seek out a neurosurgeon for their evaluation and diagnosis for proper treatment.

What type of doctor treats spine issues?

Most spine surgeons are either orthopedic surgeons or neurosurgeons who are fellowship-trained in spine. Patients with problems in any region of the musculoskeletal system. For example, those with broken bones, dislocations, back pain, spine and limb deformities, torn ligaments, and arthritis.

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What’s the difference between a neurologist and a orthopedic doctor?

While an orthopedic doctor may work with injuries like broken bones, a neurologist is more likely to treat spinal injuries that may require surgery. In fact, only neurologists have the skill and ability to perform surgery in specific areas of the spine like the dura.

Does a neurologist treat back pain?

People often think of a chiropractic doctor for chronic pain, but neurologists also diagnose and treat back pain and neck pain. Neurologists specialize in conditions and diseases that affect the brain, the spinal cord, and the nervous system; this often includes chronic pain in the back and neck.

What is the best doctor for lower back pain?

Start with someone who specializes in nonsurgical treatment for back pain. This can include a physiatrist, chiropractor, physical therapist, or orthopaedic physician assistant. They can evaluate your condition and offer appropriate treatment to help alleviate your pain.

Why would I be referred to a spine specialist?

A physician will refer their patient to a spine surgeon if and when: A patient has acute or chronic pain in the back or neck. An injury that affects the back, neck or parts of the nervous system. A person suffers from a degenerative medical condition that affects the bones, muscles or nerves along the length of the …

Why would you see a spine specialist?

Important factors that patients may want to consider prior to seeing a spine surgeon for their low back pain include: Level of low back pain and/or leg pain. If the pain is not alleviated by non-surgical treatments and has continued for a few weeks or months, it may be time to see a spine surgeon.

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What is the latest treatment for spinal stenosis?

VertiFlex™ Superion™ Another treatment option for lumbar spinal stenosis, if it doesn’t respond to other pain management techniques, is a procedure that increases the space in your spinal column without surgically removing the lamina or spinal bone.. In this treatment, Dr.

What is the best treatment for degenerative disc disease?

Treatments for degenerative disc disease

  • Pain relievers like acetaminophen.
  • Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen.
  • Corticosteroid injection into the disc space.
  • Prescription pain medication.

What symptoms associated with back pain should prompt you to see a doctor?

8 Signs You Should See a Doctor for Your Back Pain

  • Pain that won’t go away. …
  • Severe back pain that extends beyond the back. …
  • Numbness, tingling, or weakness. …
  • Pain after an accident. …
  • Pain that is worse at certain times. …
  • Problems with your bowels or urination. …
  • Unexplained weight loss. …
  • Fever.
Your podiatrist