Where does spinal meningitis come from?

Spinal meningitis is a potentially deadly infection of the meninges, the protective tissue covering the brain and spinal cord. It can be caused by specific viruses, bacteria, or fungi that gets transmitted from person to person by sneezing, talking, kissing, or sharing food or drinks.

Where Is Spinal Meningitis most likely to be found?

Meningococcal disease occurs worldwide, with the highest incidence of disease found in the ‘meningitis belt’ of sub-Saharan Africa.

How Serious Is Spinal Meningitis?

Spinal meningitis is an infection of the fluid and membranes around the brain and spinal cord. Once infection starts, it can spread rapidly through the body. Without treatment it can cause brain damage in a matter of hours and can be fatal within 24 hours.

Who is most at risk for spinal meningitis?

Anyone can get meningococcal disease, but rates of disease are highest in children younger than 1 year old, with a second peak in adolescence. Among teens and young adults, those 16 through 23 years old have the highest rates of meningococcal disease.

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How are you born with spinal meningitis?

Your baby can get meningitis when bacteria, viruses, or a fungus infecting another part of their body travels in the bloodstream to their brain and spinal cord. Out of 1,000 live births, about 0.1 to 0.4 neonates (a baby less than 28 days old) get meningitis, estimates a 2017 review.

Is Spinal Meningitis painful?

The stiff neck due to meningitis is more than just sore. Trying to lower the chin to the chest causes pain and may be impossible. Moving the head in other directions is not as difficult. However, some people do not have a stiff neck, and some have back pain.

Can spinal meningitis cause problems later in life?

Meningitis and septicaemia can cause a range of disabilities and problems that can alter lives. After effects may be temporary or permanent, physical or emotional.

What is the survival rate of spinal meningitis?

WHAT IS THE PROGNOSIS? Prognosis of meningitis depends on the cause. Untreated bacterial meningitis has a very high death rate. Even with appropriate treatment, the death rate from bacterial meningitis is about 15-20%, with a higher death rate associated with increasing age.

How long does spinal meningitis last?

Most people who get mild viral meningitis usually recover completely in 7 to 10 days without treatment. Antiviral medicine may help people with meningitis caused by viruses such as herpesvirus and influenza.

How long does it take to recover from spinal meningitis?

If you are diagnosed with viral meningitis, you will usually find that symptoms improve within a few days and most recover fully after one to four weeks.

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What gender is most affected by meningitis?

Meningococcal meningitis primarily affects infants, children, and young adults. Males are affected slightly more than females, and account for 55% of all cases, with an incidence of 1.2 cases per 100,000 population, compared to 1 case per 100,000 population among females.

Is Spinal meningitis curable?

Antibiotics can’t cure viral meningitis, and most cases improve on their own in several weeks. Treatment of mild cases of viral meningitis usually includes: Bed rest.

Who is prone to meningitis?

Children between the ages of 1 month and 2 years are the most susceptible to bacterial meningitis. Adults with certain risk factors are also susceptible. You are at higher risk if you abuse alcohol, have chronic nose and ear infections, sustain a head injury or get pneumococcal pneumonia.

How long can you have meningitis without knowing?

The first symptoms of viral meningitis typically appear between 3 to 7 days after being exposed to the infection. Symptoms of bacterial meningitis appear and progress quickly – bacterial meningitis is the most dangerous type of meningitis, and the infection progresses the fastest.

What are the signs of meningitis in adults?

Symptoms of meningitis

  • a high temperature (fever)
  • being sick.
  • a headache.
  • a rash that does not fade when a glass is rolled over it (but a rash will not always develop)
  • a stiff neck.
  • a dislike of bright lights.
  • drowsiness or unresponsiveness.
  • seizures (fits)
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