When should a physical therapist or an orthopedic specialist be consulted?

When Should an Orthopedic Specialist Be Consulted? You can almost always count on your own body to tell you that you need to see a doctor, so pay close attention. If swelling, inflammation or pain in an injured area gradually subsides and function is fully restored, there is probably no need to see a specialist.

When should I see an orthopedic doctor?

In terms of when to see an orthopedic specialist or a PCP, there are a few telltale indicators that it’s time: chronic pain, an inability to perform everyday functions, a limited range of motion, trouble walking or standing, or if you have a sprain or another soft tissue injury that hasn’t improved in 48 hours.

Why would you be referred to an orthopedic?

Broken bones, compression fractures, stress fractures, dislocations, muscle injury, and tendon tears or ruptures are common reasons people visit orthopedic doctors. Athletes will often work with orthopedists to help prevent future injury and optimize performance.

Do I need a referral to see an orthopedic?

In some cases, you may not even need to see your general practitioner and can simply take the initiative to see a specialist on your own. Most of the time, though, insurance companies do require that you speak with your primary care provider and receive a written referral before seeing an orthopedic specialist.

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Can I go straight to an orthopedic?

Depending on your specific injury or health issue, however, going directly to a specialist—like an orthopaedic physician—can save you time and money.

What is the difference between orthopedic and Orthopaedic?

Orthopaedic vs. … Orthopaedic and orthopedic both refer to the exact same specialty, with just slightly different spelling variations. Orthopaedics is the original British form of the word and Orthopedics is the more commonly used, Americanized version.

How do I prepare for an orthopedic appointment?

Consider these important guidelines in preparing for your orthopaedic appointment.

  1. Bring documents. A few days before your appointment, make a checklist of all that you need to bring with you. …
  2. Explain your pain. …
  3. Prepare your questions. …
  4. Be ready for more. …
  5. Put the plan in action. …
  6. Making your orthopaedic appointment.

What can I expect at an orthopedic appointment?

The doctor will observe your general ability to move around while walking, sitting, standing, climbing stairs, bending forward and backward, and performing other basic movements. These tests help the orthopaedic surgeon rule out or confirm possible diagnoses.

What does an orthopedic doctor look at?

Orthopaedic surgeons are devoted to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders of the bones, joints, ligaments, tendons and muscles. Some orthopaedists are generalists, while others specialize in certain areas of the body, such as: Hip and knee. Foot and ankle.

How long does an orthopedic referral take?

Orthopedic referral should be made within 7-10 days. Patients with any joint instability should be referred to orthopedics immediately.

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What is an orthopedic specialist called?

What Does an Orthopedist Do? Orthopedists handle the disorders, injuries, prevention, treatment, and repair of the skeletal system and its related joints, ligaments, and muscles. Orthopedists and orthopedic surgeons are specially trained in the diagnosis and treatment of bone and joint disease.

What are the symptoms of orthopedic?

Symptoms of Orthopedic Conditions

  • Numbness.
  • Muscle pain.
  • Weakness.
  • Joint pain.
  • Warmth.
  • Stiffness.
  • Restricted range of motion.
  • Swelling.

What is an orthopedic problem?

Orthopedic conditions are injuries and diseases that affect the musculoskeletal system. This body system includes the muscles, bones, nerves, joints, ligaments, tendons, and other connective tissues. Damage to any of these tissues or structures can come from chronic orthopedic diseases or from an injury.

Your podiatrist